Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

FAQs

On 28th March the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board executive team confirmed Principality Stadium had been secured as a surge hospital. On 20th April the temporary field hospital, Ysbyty Calon Y Ddraig, Dragon’s Heart Hospital, was officially opened by His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales

In a collaborative effort with support from the Welsh Rugby Union, Cardiff City Council and Cardiff Blues, the Principality Stadium and surrounding areas were identified as suitable venues to accommodate the anticipated increase in demand, and Ysbyty Calon Y Ddraig, Dragon’s Heart Hospital was established, with the first 300 of 2,000 beds available within just 10 days.

On the 28th April, the first patient was admitted to Ysbyty Calon y Ddraig, Dragon’s Heart Hospital as part of the next phase of the Health Board’s response to Covid-19. In total there were 46 patients admitted to the field hospital.

Welsh Government modelling originally predicted the pandemic to cause a very steep and extreme demand on the NHS, or create extreme demand on services. Therefore, it was decided a field hospital with additional beds would be created to accommodate that extreme demand.

The pandemic hasn’t turned out in the way that was originally predicated, with the Health Board able to dampen that demand through stringent social distancing measures and the support of the general public. This meant the spread of Covid-19 was not as significant as modelling originally stated, but it does mean that the pandemic will last a lot longer.

Cardiff and Vale UHB has been working hard to use all of the capacity currently available to get specialist services back online within the Health Board’s hospital sites. In order to do this in as safe a space possible for patients, Covid-19 positive patients could be transferred to Ysbyty Calon y Ddraig, Dragon’s Heart Hospital to allow the Health Board to accommodate increased access to specialist services.

 

The beds across the Cardiff and Vale UHB were used in line with need of the patients. Thankfully we did not have the spike in numbers in the original modelling due to the stringent lockdown and social distancing. As a result we could manage the patients within the capacity of the Cardiff and Vale UHB. Should we have had a significant rise in numbers as experienced by our neighbouring health boards, we would have been in a strong position to have coped with a surge in Covid-19 patients.

The hospital was funded by Welsh Government to support the communities of Cardiff and the Vale of Glamorgan, and potentially across other heard board areas in Wales.

The exact costs are yet to be finalised as these will include operational running costs and decommissioning costs. All of the financial elements are being closely monitored and will be reported back to the Cardiff and Vale UHB Executive Board and Welsh Government in line with normal practice for audit and good governance.

The Ysbyty Calon y Ddraig, Dragon’s Heart Hospital was always planned as a temporary hospital to cope with a potential surge in Covid-19 patients based upon scientific modelling and predictions of numbers. At present we are learning to coexist with Covid-19 and the numbers are fluctuating. The decision to decommission Ysbyty Calon Y Ddraig, Dragon’s Heart Hospital is in line with Cardiff and Vale UHB’s agreement with the Welsh Rugby Union and the continuation of the Health Board’s plans to coexist with the virus, which follow Welsh Government’s modelling on the trajectory of the virus. The Welsh Rugby Union require the stadium back for the Six Nations 2021 with the first game scheduled for February 2021. This is the current timescale we are working towards.

The Ysbyty Calon y Ddraig, Dragon’s Heart Hospital was always planned as a temporary hospital to cope with a potential surge in Covid-19 patients based upon scientific modelling and predictions of numbers. At present we are learning to coexist with Covid-19 and the numbers are fluctuating. The decision to decommission Ysbyty Calon Y Ddraig, Dragon’s Heart Hospital is in line with Cardiff and Vale UHB’s agreement with the Welsh Rugby Union and the continuation of the Health Board’s plans to coexist with the virus, which follow Welsh Government’s modelling on the trajectory of the virus. The Welsh Rugby Union require the stadium back for the Six Nations 2021 with the first game scheduled for February 2021. This is the current timescale we are working towards.

The Welsh Government has announced funding for a new modular build surge inpatient facility on site at the University Hospital of Wales. The surge facility will support Cardiff and Vale UHB’s planning for increased capacity of up to 400 additional patients in response to the current modelling predications and a second wave of Covid-19.

The modular build will be aligned to the decommissioning programme of Ysbyty Calon y Ddraig, Dragon’s Heart Hospital, which will have been vacated during the autumn to enable the Welsh Rugby Union to follow their timeline for the Six Nations 2021

It was always an agreement with the Welsh Rugby Union that they would require the stadium back for the Six Nations in 2021 with the first game scheduled for 7th February 2021. After consultation with the WRU and the Welsh Government, it was agreed to terminate the use of the stadium as a field hospital.

Furthermore, based on scientific modelling and data from Welsh Government colleagues and local intelligence, the Health Board will need to provide 600 additional beds to accommodate predicted capacity. Ysbyty Calon Y Ddraig, Dragon’s Heart Hospital can accommodate up to 2,000 beds which is far greater than the Health Board requires. A rigorous options appraisal process was undergone and building a temporary facility at the University Hospital of Wales (UHW) was evaluated as the best option, both financially and operationally.  

The specialist equipment from Ysbyty Calon Y Ddraig / Dragon’s Heart Hospital will be redeployed for use at the new surge hospital.

Scroll to top